LLC articles of amendment are important documents that are filed with the secretary of state. They are used to amend any part of an LLC’s formation, whether that’s changing its name or adding a new member. This article will cover everything you need to know about LLC articles of amendment so you can decide if this is something your business needs.

Articles Of Amendment

Make sure you follow the rules of your state.

While the procedures for amending an LLC are fairly uniform, you should be aware that there are some variations based on your state.

Some states have specific rules for amending an LLC. Some of these rules only apply to specific types of companies, such as corporations or partnerships. Others may apply only to one industry (e.g., healthcare) or any number of industries (e.g., retail). 

If you plan to continue doing business in a particular state after you’ve amended your LLC’s articles of organization, take time to research its laws regarding amendment so you don’t find yourself in legal trouble down the road!

What is an LLC Articles of Amendment?

An LLC article of amendment is a document that changes the original articles of the organization for an LLC. 

It will usually change the name and/or address, but it can also add or remove members from the company. The amendment must be filed with the Secretary of State in order for it to take effect; if it’s filed incorrectly or contains errors, your business may not be able to open its doors for business or collect checks from customers.

An amendment is often required when an LLC changes its name and/or address, but there are other reasons why you might want to amend your initial filings as well. For example:

  • You’ve changed locations after opening up shop at another venue (but haven’t yet informed your customers).
  • You need to add new members because one has left or died (and therefore no longer meets local requirements).
  • A partner wants all profits instead of just half (or vice versa) once again changing his status in accordance with state law regarding partnerships between multiple parties who share profits based on their contributions toward making products or services available within marketplaces throughout America today!

How do I file my LLC articles of amendment?

When you are ready to amend your LLC’s articles of organization, it is important that you file the amendment in writing with the Secretary of State. You will also need to pay a fee for filing. 

The Secretary of State will not accept your amendment if it is not written in a format that is acceptable to them. This means that if you cannot find the form on their website, then it may be better for you to hire an attorney who can write up this document for you and make sure it meets all the requirements specified by law.

How long will it take before my amendment becomes effective?

The time it takes for your amendment to become effective depends on the state. Some states are known to take a long time—up to six months or more—to process amendments. This can be frustrating, but there’s nothing you can do about it except wait patiently and contact your Secretary of State if you have any questions or concerns.

You can find the contact information for your Secretary of State by searching online for “Secretary of State [your state].”

How much does filing an amendment cost?

The cost of filing an amendment varies by state, but you can expect to pay between $25 and $250. The price will depend on the number of pages in your document, whether it’s a one-party or multi-party document (meaning more than one person is involved), and other factors.

  • In California, amendments typically cost between $50 and $200.
  • In New York City, you’ll pay between $250 and $500 for an amendment that takes up less than 20 pages of text or has no attachments or exhibits. If it’s longer than 20 pages or contains other documents like affidavits and exhibits, you may be charged an extra fee for each additional exhibit attached to your LLC Articles Of Amendment.

What happens if I don’t amend my LLC?

  • The failure to file articles of the amendment will result in liability for any debts incurred by the LLC. This can be a problem if you have no way to repay these debts, so it’s important to take this step as soon as possible.
  • You won’t be able to sell your interest in the company or transfer ownership of your membership share of an LLC that hasn’t been amended. If someone wants to buy into your business, they won’t be able to do so until you amend your articles of organization and make them current again.
  • You won’t be able to dissolve an unamended LLC and distribute its assets among members (if any). There also may be other legal complications with dissolving an unamended LLC that would prevent you from distributing its assets at all, such as having outstanding debts or tax liabilities owed by either yourself or the company itself.
  • You won’t be able to change the name of your business without filing new articles with the state where you registered it—and even then it can sometimes take up several weeks before a name change is approved by secretaries’ offices across different states!

Filing Articles Of Amendment will update your record with the Secretary of State.

To amend your LLC, you’ll need to file Articles of Amendment with the Secretary of State. If you don’t do this, and your business is legally required to file taxes or pay fees like sales tax, the government will be the first to let you know that you’re doing something wrong by not filing. 

By amending your company’s status with the state, you’ll update its record and ensure that it has everything it needs for continued operations. You can amend an existing LLC’s Articles Of Organization quickly by clicking “Amend” under “File” on our website.

Conclusion

Once you’ve filed your Articles of Amendment, you will be able to use your business name in public. This can help protect your company from trademark infringement and other legal issues. 

In addition, filing amendments is a good way to keep track of any changes that have been made since the last amendment was filed—whether it’s adding or removing members, changing contact information, or even updating your registered agent address if needed.